Best and Worst Foods for Hemorrhoids

Dr. Betsy Clemens and her team at Midwest Hemorrhoid Treatment Center are experts at treating hemorrhoids with effective, non

Hemorrhoids are a common occurrence that’s often related to the characteristics of your stool and how easy it is for your bowels to pass said stools. So, what’s food got to do with it? The foods you eat and the liquids you consume help determine the nature of your stools.

Dr. Betsy Clemens and her team at Midwest Hemorrhoid Treatment Center are experts at treating hemorrhoids with effective, nonsurgical solutions, such as infrared coagulation (IRC). Dr. Clemens is also focused on helping prevent hemorrhoids and the discomfort they cause. One way of doing that is to make a few changes to your diet.

You are what you eat

It’s an often-repeated adage and research-proven fact that the foods and beverages you consume regularly can greatly impact your health. It’s certainly true that what you eat and drink directly influences the types of stools you produce -- and hemorrhoids are often linked to the nature of your stools.

Infrequent or difficult-to-pass stools, for instance, may result in the bulging anal or rectal veins associated with hemorrhoids as you’re forced to strain excessively during a bowel movement. Frequent bouts of diarrhea also irritate and inflame rectal veins and can evolve into hemorrhoids. If you already have hemorrhoids, faulty stools can worsen the discomfort or bleeding you’re experiencing.

One of the key components of managing or preventing diet-related hemorrhoids is to follow a balanced nutrition plan -- one that includes enough fiber to keep your stools soft but formed and occurring on a regular basis. For most people, this adds up to 25-30 grams of fiber daily.

Solving the fiber puzzle

More fiber and lots of water is a quick answer to what you should include on the menu if you’re worried about hemorrhoids. Fiber comes in two types, however, and it’s the soluble fiber that keeps your stools soft but well-formed and easy to pass.

Found in foods like oats, soluble fiber dissolves into a gel-like substance when mixed with the water that’s added during the digestive process. The second type of fiber is insoluble, sometimes called roughage. It adds bulk to your stool and keeps things moving through your system, but it does not dissolve.  

Generally, Dr. Clemens recommends that about one-third of your daily fiber intake consist of soluble fiber. Many fiber-rich foods contain both types of fiber. And you’ll need 8-10 large glasses of water per day to keep all this fiber moving through your system.

Foods to embrace

Beans, lentils, and nuts are fiber-rich foods that can add a boost of flavor to salads, chilis, and rice. Depending on the type you choose, a half cup of beans can contain 7-10 grams of fiber, both soluble and insoluble. It takes just 20 almonds to add 3 grams of fiber to your salad. A half cup of edamame adds the same fiber grams as the almonds but about half the calories.

Other high-fiber foods to choose include:

Most fruits and some foods, such as potatoes, hold some of their fiber and many other nutrients in the skin. Choose thin-skinned fruits such as apples, pears, and plums to help ensure you get the fiber and flavor you desire.

Foods to avoid

Low-fiber foods that can cause or worsen constipation and lead to hemorrhoids include:

For more information about what you can do to manage your hemorrhoid symptoms, schedule a visit with Dr. Clemens today. Call our office in Creve Coeur, Missouri, or book your appointment online.

You Might Also Enjoy...

What Skin Conditions Cause Anal Pain?

When anal pain and discomfort strike, the effects can be far-reaching, impacting your ability to simply get through your day. Here are some of the likely culprits and how to solve your problem.

5 Simple Ways You Can Prevent Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids may not be a popular topic of conversation, but they’re a common problem that affects 3 in 4 adults during their lifetime. There are simple changes you can make in your lifestyle to help prevent this painful condition.

Why Is There Blood in My Stool?

Finding blood where you least expect it, like in your stool, can understandably cause alarm. Here’s a look at the many reasons for this unwelcome development, which is more common than you might think.

When to See a Doctor About Constipation

Constipation happens to almost everyone and usually isn’t cause for concern. But there are times when constipation warrants medical intervention, not only for your comfort, but for your overall health.