When Your Anal Discomfort Needs Medical Attention

Though you may have a difficult time discussing your discomfort with friends and family, anal pain is more common than you might think. In most cases, the underlying cause of the discomfort isn’t serious, but the pain can be severe because the perianal region contains many nerve endings. There are times, therefore, when your anal discomfort needs medical attention. 

At Midwest Hemorrhoid Treatment Center in Creve Coeur, Missouri, our board-certified family physician, Dr. Betsey Clemens, specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of anorectal disorders. 

Given our knowledge and experience, we want you to know when your anal discomfort needs medical attention.

Discomfort lasts longer than two days

Anal discomfort may develop from a range of causes. You may experience soreness from frequent wiping if you’re having diarrhea, or fleeting discomfort from constipation when passing a large, hard stool.

However, when your anal discomfort lasts longer than two days, it’s time for you to get medical attention. In many cases, hemorrhoids are responsible for ongoing anal tenderness. We also specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhoids, and we can develop a plan to alleviate your pain. 

Anal fissures are another potential source of prolonged anal discomfort. An anal fissure is a tear in the sensitive anal tissue. Pain usually occurs after a bowel movement and lingers for hours. 

Pain worsens

Pain is a symptom your body uses to let you know something isn’t right. When your anal discomfort worsens or spreads to other areas, you need medical attention.

Though your worsening anal discomfort may be related to an anal fissure or hemmorrhoids, your symptoms may be signs of an abscess or infection. 

You also have rectal bleeding

Blood in your stool may signal all your alarm bells, but rectal bleeding is most often caused by a benign condition. Nevertheless, if your anal discomfort is accompanied by rectal bleeding, you need to schedule a medical evaluation.

Hemorrhoids and anal fissures are common causes of rectal bleeding. However, the blood in your stool may also be signs of diverticular disease, a peptic ulcer, or colon cancer. 

When you come in with anal discomfort and rectal bleeding, we perform a number of diagnostic tests to confirm or rule out the underlying cause, including a stool test, colonoscopy, or esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). 

Anal discomfort may be an embarrassing symptom you’d rather ignore. However, getting medical attention for your symptoms may alleviate your fears and clear up your discomfort quickly.

Let us help you get the answers you need. Contact our office by calling 636-228-3186, or by scheduling an appointment online today.

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